She Don’t Tell Me To

February 3, 2008 at 3:58 pm Leave a comment

Montgomery Gentry, a rockin’ country band, has a great song called “She Don’t Tell Me To“.  The song talks about how a man does nice things for his lady – bringing flowers home, going to church, coming home early from a night with the boys – precisely because she doesn’t ask him to do so.  He’s not nagged or coerced into it, so he does it freely and openly because he wants to.

That’s a great analogy for dieting.  We always rebel against what we’re forced to do.  If our parents told us we couldn’t eat something, most likely we’d sneak it in somehow.  I sure did.  My dad was very restrictive with my food, and I would sneak stuff all the time.  (Twinkies were my favorite!)  The situation went beyond food and became a battle of wills… a way for me to establish myself a viable person who had the right to make her own choices.

My mum had a mild weight problem when she was a teenager that grew through her adult life.  Her parents, particularly her dad, would alternately berate her or offer her incentives like money to eat less and exercise more.  Even at a $1 a pound, it never worked.  She fought every step of the way, and in the end, kept gaining weight, becoming progressively more sedentary as an adult.  Her parents’ tough tactics resulted in the exact opposite of the behavior they were seeking.

I’ve learned over the years that the only way a lifestyle change is going to last is if it’s truly what you want to do.  No one can scare, bully, or bribe you into it.  That may work for a time, but you’ll revert to your old ways eventually.  The daily discipline of a diet-and-exercise plan requires an internal commitment that no one can mandate.

So, the old adage is true: if you’re going to do it, do it for you.  That’s the only way it’ll last.

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Entry filed under: Weight Loss Philosophy. Tags: , , , , , , , .

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